PGCS 2019 voted the best ever!!

The Project Governance & Controls Symposium held in Canberra last week saw 200+ people enjoy: 2 international keynote plenary presentations, 5 Australian keynote plenary presentations, 27 stream presentations spread across 5 streams, and 2 panel sessions; making PGCS 2019 one of the busiest and best symposiums ever! 

One highlight from the 2 days was the opening address, and presentation of the Walt Lipke award, by the Hon. Andrew Gee MP, Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister.  This year’s award recipient was Professor Shankar Sankaran from UTS.

Our international speakers then conducted two outstanding Master Classes on day 3: A Practical Guide to Implementing Complex Systems Governance Concepts on Projects, and Integrating Systems Engineering and Project Management. The Match Made in Heaven Which Increases the Probability of Project Success.

We are now working on uploading all of the presentations and workshop notes to the PGCS website – project managers are good at multi-tasking and time management, but no-one can be in five rooms at the same time……  These papers will also form part of the PGCS library and can be accessed by anyone interested in improving their project management knowledge. Planning for PGCS 2020 is already underway, the Symposium will be on the 18th and 19th August 2020, followed by Masterclasses on the 20th.  

For updates see: https://www.pgcsymposium.org.au

New Articles posted to the Web #71

BeaverWe have been busy beavers updating the PM Knowledge Index on our website with White Papers and Articles.   Some of the more interesting uploaded during the last couple of weeks include:

You are welcome to download and use the information under our Creative Commons licence

Project Governance & Controls Symposium – 20-21st August, Canberra

I’m looking forward to chairing this years symposium. The PGCS program is locked and loaded! We have a full program of speakers locked down, and the program is loaded with talented and interesting presentations.

Our opening keynote speaker will be Assistant Minister Andrew Gee, focusing on the massive investment the Government is making in infrastructure, and the importance of our focus, governance and controls, in achieving value for money.

Contestability is another important subject, and key to Federal Government procurement. If you are interested in understanding how Defence manages this process, you can’t afford to miss the presentation by Ciril Karo, head of the Contestability Division. Ciril will talk about the genesis of the contestability function, how defence approach it, and tie contestability into the Capability Life Cycle model defence use.

These are just the tip of the iceberg – for the full program see: https://www.pgcsymposium.org.au/program.html

New Articles posted to the Web #70

BeaverWe have been busy beavers updating the PM Knowledge Index on our website with White Papers and Articles.   Some of the more interesting uploaded during the last couple of weeks include:

And we continue to tweet a free PMI style of exam question every day for PMP, CAPM, and PMI-SP candidates: See today’s question and then click through for the answer and the Q&As from last week.

You are welcome to download and use the information under our Creative Commons licence

PMP Exam Changes – 15 Dec 19

PMI have announced the biggest change in the PMP exam since the change to a 200 question format last century

The just released PMP® Exam Content Outline has radically reformed the examination to reflect the diverse skills and approaches needed by project managers to deliver outcomes and value to their organizations.  The new exam will cover both predictive (~50%) and agile/hybrid (~50%) approaches to project management (the current exam is 90%+ predictive); this change will bring the Agile Practice Guide, bundled with the PMBOK® Guide 6th Edition into the exam.

Of equal significance, the domains and tasks that frame the examination have been completely reorganized to align with real-life practices. The number of domains will be reduced from five to three. Specific project management approaches will not be aligned to individual domains, but will be incorporated throughout the exam.  The new domains are:

People (42%): emphasizing the skills and activities associated with effectively leading a project team.

Process (50%): reinforcing the technical aspects of managing a project.

Business Environment (8%): highlighting the connection between projects and organization strategy.

Predictive, agile and hybrid approaches, will be included across the three exam domains. The best way to understand what is included in the exam is to review the updated Exam Content Outline, download from: https://www.pmi.org/certifications/types/project-management-pmp/exam-prep/changes

Given the extent of these changes, anyone studying current course material will need to have passed their PMP exam by December, or face a completely new course of study.  Based on previous changes to the PMP exam there is no leeway, exams taken on or before the 15 December will be the current exam, those taken on or after the 16 December will be the new exam (including any deferrals and re-sits).

This shift in the PMP exam is focused on supporting information technology and business organizations, reflects the needs of most current PMI members, and should be applauded. However, from our perspective, the shift is moving the core of the exam into areas we have no specific skills in.

My career has focused on supporting major engineering, construction and defense projects which require disciplined project controls. And while we can rewrite our materials, our core differentiation has always been the fact we are not just a training organization, rather we have real-world experience that we can bring into our courses.

Consequently, we have decided to pull out of the PMP training market at the end of this year to focus on courses where we still have core real-world knowledge and experience including:

  • PMI-SP: we are one of the few organizations world-wide teaching this course and the only one with an international reputation in project controls and scheduling – see more.
  • EVM: our new EVM short course is designed for people who need to understand the concepts of Earned Value based n the ISO 21508 standard – see more.

In the meantime – if you are interested in obtaining the PMP credential you have a 5-month window to sit the current exam we all know and understand – see more.

Leading up to the exam we are in ‘known territory’ – PMI use a normal distribution to determine the cut off for pass-fail. The number of candidates does not change the score, it is the ‘average’ score and the distribution of scores in any given period that sets the cut off. This adjustment is necessary because the questions in the exam change regularly and PMI are seeking to balance the degree of difficulty over time. We know how this works and what a ‘pass’ looks like in our training course. The last part of 2019 will be busy given the scope of the change in the PMP exam but that’s all.  Come December the 15th no one will really know what the requirements are for several months……

New Articles posted to the Web #69

BeaverWe have been busy beavers updating the PM Knowledge Index on our website with White Papers and Articles.   Some of the more interesting uploaded during the last couple of weeks include:

And we continue to tweet a free PMI style of exam question every day for PMP, CAPM, and PMI-SP candidates: See today’s question and then click through for the answer and the Q&As from last week.

You are welcome to download and use the information under our Creative Commons licence

New Articles posted to the Web #68

BeaverWe have been busy beavers updating the PM Knowledge Index on our website with White Papers and Articles.   Some of the more interesting uploaded during the last couple of weeks include:

And we continue to tweet a free PMI style of exam question every day for PMP, CAPM, and PMI-SP candidates: See today’s question and then click through for the answer and the Q&As from last week.

You are welcome to download and use the information under our Creative Commons licence