Monthly Archives: March 2015

New Articles posted to the Web #22

BeaverWe have been busy beavers updating the PM Knowledge Index on our website with White Papers and Articles.   Some of the more interesting uploaded during the last couple of weeks include:

And we continue to tweet a free PMI style of exam question every day for PMP, CAPM and PMI-SP candidates: See today’s question and then click through for the answer and the Q&As from last week.

You are welcome to download and use the information under our Creative Commons licence

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If you screw-up, own-up

Screw-upOne of the traits that strong leaders and credible advisers have is the willingness to ‘own up’ to mistakes they’ve made.  No one operating effectively as a project or program manager, or for that matter any type of manager making decisions can expect to be correct 100% of the time.

If you do something new some mistakes are inevitable. If you accept risks, some negative outcomes are inevitable. And time pressures increase the probability of error. And given project management is all about accepting and managing risks to create a ‘new’ product service or result under time and cost pressures – we probably have more opportunity to ‘get it wrong’ than most.

The generally accepted way to deal with ‘your mistake is:

  • Acknowledge it (“my mistake”)
  • Make restitution if needed (eg apologise)
  • Learn from it
  • Move on, only people who have never made anything have never made a mistake.

Conversely if someone makes a mistake involving you look for the best outcome rather than blame of revenge. We have discussed these concepts in a couple of posts:

https://mosaicprojects.wordpress.com/2011/10/01/mistakes/

https://mosaicprojects.wordpress.com/2008/12/13/learning-from-your-mistakes/

What is rare is a really good example of the basic steps outlined above being implemented.  This changed with a publication on page one of yesterday’s Age (also reported in the Sydney Morning Herald). What could have been a bitter and dragged out defamation case – you probably cannot be more insulting these days than incorrectly accusing a Muslim of being a terrorist – both The Age and the aggrieve person applied common sense and resolved the issue in a way that would appear to have left everyone ‘feeling good’ and with a sense of closure, not to mention thousands of their readers.

If you missed the item, you can read the story at: http://www.smh.com.au/national/fairfax-media-says-sorry-20150303-13ttpd.html

Mistakes are inevitable – strong people deal with them in an appropriate way, The Age’s example being exemplary.  This is a salient lesson we can all learn from.

Project Governance and Controls Symposium (PGCS) 2015

The Project Governance and Controls Symposium (PGCS) 2015 will be held on 6-7 May 2015 at the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA) thanks to the continued platinum sponsorship provided by the University of New South Wales Canberra.

The PGCS is the only annual project governance, controls and management event held in Australia. It has a unique focus on the project governance and control needs of the Australian Federal Government from the perspectives of Government agencies, Industry and Academia. The Symposium is focused towards public sector projects and seeks to engage with Defence/DMO and other large departments because they have they have the largest, longest running and most nationally significant projects in Australia.

The PGC Symposium also differs significantly to those run by other organisations.  While it does not ignore the soft skills (they are a critical part of governance),  the focus is on the quantitative project control techniques that are essential to providing a clear and objective status of where a project is truly at – particularly for major capital acquisition projects – and how this information supported effective governance.

The PGCS is supported by the Australian Institute for Project Management (AIPM), and a range of other project management bodies.

For more information visit the conference website at: http://www.pgcs.org.au/

Bookings are now open and it is not too late to offer a paper – contact me if you are interested in speaking.